Volume 4, Issue 1, March 2018, Page: 1-4
Antistreptolysin O Titers: Normal Values for Children Ages 5 to 15 at Debre Berhan Referral Hospital, Ethiopia
Tsegahun Asfaw, Department of Medical Laboratory Science, Debre Berhan University, Debre Berhan, Ethiopia
Demissew Shenkute, Department of Medical Laboratory Science, Debre Berhan University, Debre Berhan, Ethiopia
Mihret Tilahun, Department of Medical Laboratory Science, Debre Berhan University, Debre Berhan, Ethiopia
Nigus Zegeye, Department of Medical Laboratory Science, Debre Berhan University, Debre Berhan, Ethiopia
Received: Feb. 15, 2018;       Accepted: Mar. 27, 2018;       Published: Apr. 20, 2018
DOI: 10.11648/j.jfmhc.20180401.11      View  1134      Downloads  34
Abstract
Anti-streptolysin O (ASO) titer assists for the diagnosis of Group A, Group C and Group G streptococcal infections and their sequele. Reference value of Anti-streptolysin O titer is not available for Ethiopian populations. This study determined the upper limit of normal reference value in apparently healthy children. Participants with a history of streptococal disease were excluded. A total of 127 blood samples were collected from 127 participants with age range of 5-15 years. Serum was used to determine Anti-Streptolysin O-titers. The average ASO Upper limits of Normal (ULN) titer for the total participants was 360 IU/ml with a median 200 IU/ml. The ASO ULN for both male and female children was 320 IU/ml with a median of 200IU/ml. The highest ASO ULN was observed for the age group of 9-12 years (400 IU/ml with median of 200 IU/ml) followed by 360 IU/ml for the age group 5-8 years and age group 13-15 years with a median of 200 IU/ml. This finding shows that ASO ULN are similar to those reported in countries with different climates and populations. Package inserts interpreting ASO titer > 400 IU/ml as recent streptococcal infection is applicable for Ethiopian population.
Keywords
Children, Apparently Healthy, ASO Titers, Ethiopia
To cite this article
Tsegahun Asfaw, Demissew Shenkute, Mihret Tilahun, Nigus Zegeye, Antistreptolysin O Titers: Normal Values for Children Ages 5 to 15 at Debre Berhan Referral Hospital, Ethiopia, Journal of Family Medicine and Health Care. Vol. 4, No. 1, 2018, pp. 1-4. doi: 10.11648/j.jfmhc.20180401.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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