Volume 5, Issue 3, September 2019, Page: 32-37
HIV/TB Integrated Services: Perception of HIV and TB Clients in a Tertiary Health Facility in Lagos State Nigeria
Stellamaris Moronkeji, Department of Public Health, School of Public Health, Texila American University, Georgetown Guyana, South America
Ebenezer Obi Daniel, Department of Public Health, School of Public Health, Texila American University, Georgetown Guyana, South America
Ogunnaike Adewale Adeyemi, Department of Health Policy and Management, Faculty of Public Health, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria
Paul Olaiya Abiodun, Department of Public Health, School of Public Health, Texila American University, Georgetown Guyana, South America
Lily Ize-Iyamu, Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Benin, Benin, Nigeria
Abuworonye Fadeke, Department of Health Studies, Faculty of Social Sciences, London Metropolitan University, London, United Kingdom
Atabo Unekwu John, Department of History and International Studies, Faculty of Social Sciences, Nigerian Defence Academy, Kaduna, Nigeria
Olayinka Victor Ojo, Department of Public Health, School of Public Health, Texila American University, Georgetown Guyana, South America
Israel Olukayode Popoola, Department of Epidemiology and Community Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ilorin, Ilorin, Nigeria
Received: Aug. 27, 2019;       Accepted: Sep. 9, 2019;       Published: Sep. 18, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.jfmhc.20190503.12      View  104      Downloads  17
Abstract
HIV/AIDS remains a global public health issue which has claimed an estimated of 35 million lives since the start of the epidemic and further 78 million people still living with the virus. Tuberculosis (TB) is a major disease with high incident cases and over 1.3 million deaths recorded in 2012 even with the availability of effective chemotherapy. This survey is a descriptive, cross-sectional quantitative study among 87 enrolled clients attending HIV/TB integrated service at Lagos State University Teaching Hospital, (LASUTH) Lagos in Nigeria. Data collected were analyzed with SPSS version 21 with Chi-square used to test for association. Eighty percent (80) of the HIV clients were female while the TB patients were 41% male. Most of the respondents had only secondary school education and were married as at the time of the survey. Generally, unprotected sexual intercourse with a HIV infected person is the most known mode of spreading HIV among respondents. Majority of the respondents receives treatment for both TB and HIV in the same facility and view antiretrovirals as drugs responsible for preventing death from HIV/AIDS. While over 70% of the respondents agreed to like being visited by healthcare workers, over 60% reported to have never being visited by healthcare workers. The most reported advantages of integrated services for HIV and TB were “save cost for transportation and save time”. The survey revealed good knowledge about HIV and TB among respondents while also showing that perception about integrated HIV and TB services is welcomed among the respondents. Increasing the number of healthcare workers and incentivizing the approach for healthcare workers were recommended.
Keywords
Integrated Services, HIV, Tuberculosis (TB), Direct Observed Therapy (DOT), Antiretroviral (ARV), Community Health Workers
To cite this article
Stellamaris Moronkeji, Ebenezer Obi Daniel, Ogunnaike Adewale Adeyemi, Paul Olaiya Abiodun, Lily Ize-Iyamu, Abuworonye Fadeke, Atabo Unekwu John, Olayinka Victor Ojo, Israel Olukayode Popoola, HIV/TB Integrated Services: Perception of HIV and TB Clients in a Tertiary Health Facility in Lagos State Nigeria, Journal of Family Medicine and Health Care. Vol. 5, No. 3, 2019, pp. 32-37. doi: 10.11648/j.jfmhc.20190503.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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