Volume 6, Issue 3, September 2020, Page: 70-77
HIV Sero Status and Associated Factors Among HIV-Exposed Infants’ in Selected Health Facilities in Sidama Zone, Southern Ethiopia
Yirgalem Yosef, Department of Midwifery, College of Health Science, Wolkite University, Wolkite, Ethiopia
Bosena Tebeje, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Faculty of Health Science, Institute of Health, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia
Jophine Joseph, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Faculty of Health Science, Institute of Health, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia
Seblework Abeje, Department of Biochemistry, College of Health Science, Wolkite University, Wolkite, Ethiopia
Received: Jan. 15, 2020;       Accepted: May 27, 2020;       Published: Jun. 9, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.jfmhc.20200603.13      View  295      Downloads  39
Abstract
MTC transmission of HIV is a major public health challenge in Ethiopia; however there were a shortage of evidence on HIV sero status of exposed infants in Sidama zone, Southern Ethiopia. Therefore, this study aimed to assess, the HIV sero status and associated factors among HIV-exposed infants in selected public health facilities. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 14 public health facilities at Sidama zone SNNPR state, Ethiopia from May 1- 30/2019Gc. Medical record cards of HIV-exposed infants and their mothers enrolled from January 2014 to January 2018 was extracted using data extraction checklist. Magnitude and associated factors of HIV sero status of exposed infants was computed using SPSS version 21.0 software. A total of 203 HIV-exposed infants who had HIV DNA/PCR test results were included in the study. The overall prevalence of HIV among HIV exposed infants were nearly 9% (95% CI: 4.4, 12.8) Infants born from mothers’ with baseline CD4+ counts of mother less than 350, (AOR=5.629; 95% CI: 1.454, 21.79), Mothers who had WHO clinical stage I and II, (AOR=4.975; 95% CI: 1.342, 18.446), and Poor ART adherence (AOR=4.302; 95% CI: 1.100, 16.823) had an increased odds of HIV infection comparing to their counterparts. Conclusion and recommendation: The prevalence of HIV infection among infants born to HIV infected mothers was high in the study area. Baseline CD4+ counts, WHO clinical staging, and ART adherences of mothers are associated with their infants HIV status. Therefore, stakeholders including health care workers working at PMTCT centers should make create awareness on the effects of poor ART adherence and undertaking further rigorous longitudinal studies are recommended.
Keywords
HIV Sero Status, HIV Exposed Infants, DNA/PCR Test, OPTION B+ Strategy, Ethiopia
To cite this article
Yirgalem Yosef, Bosena Tebeje, Jophine Joseph, Seblework Abeje, HIV Sero Status and Associated Factors Among HIV-Exposed Infants’ in Selected Health Facilities in Sidama Zone, Southern Ethiopia, Journal of Family Medicine and Health Care. Vol. 6, No. 3, 2020, pp. 70-77. doi: 10.11648/j.jfmhc.20200603.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Reference
[1]
WHO. UNAIDS report on the global AIDS epidemic 2013.
[2]
EPHIA. Ethiopia population-based hiv impact assessment ephia 2017-2018.
[3]
Kassa GM. Mother-to-child transmission of HIV infection and its associated factors in Ethiopia: a systematic review and meta-analysis. BMC Infect Dis. 2018; 18 (1): 216.
[4]
WHO. Elimination of mother-to-child transmission of hiv and syphilis. 2017.
[5]
WHO. HIV prevention programmes overview. 2017.
[6]
WHO. Programmatic update use of antiretroviral drugs for treating pregnant women and preventing hiv infection in infants. 2013.
[7]
WHO. Prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV >. 2018 (08): 20.
[8]
Etoori D, Kerschberger B, Staderini N, Ndlangamandla M, Nhlabatsi B, Jobanputra K, et al. Challenges and successes in the implementation of option B+ to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV in southern Swaziland. BMC Public Health. 2018; 18 (1): 374.
[9]
WHO. Preventing mother-to-child transmission of HIV to reach the UNGASS and Millennium Development Goals. 2010.
[10]
WHO. Prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV. 2019.
[11]
WHO. Eliminating Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV by 2030: 5 Strategies to Ensure Continued Progress.
[12]
Deressa W, Seme A, Asefa A, Teshome G, Enqusellassie F. Utilization of PMTCT services and associated factors among pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2014; 14 (14): 328.
[13]
FMOH. National aids and sti’s control programme federal ministry of health 2016.
[14]
EDHS. Demographic and Health Survey HIV Prevalence Report. 2016.
[15]
FDRE. Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia | Ministry of Health for comprehensive hiv prevention, care and treatment national guidelines for comprehensive hiv prevention, care and treatment 2014.
[16]
Prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission cascade in China: a systematic review and meta-analysis. 2014.
[17]
Esther A, Nlend N, Motaze ACN. HIV-1 transmission and survival according to feeding options in infants born to HIVinfected women in Yaoundé, Cameroon. 2018.
[18]
Mwau M, Bwana P, Kithinji L, Ogollah F, Ochieng S, Akinyi C, et al. Mother-to-child transmission of HIV in Kenya: A cross-sectional analysis of the national database over nine years. PLoS One. 2017; 12 (8): e0183860.
[19]
Ngwende S, Gombe NT, Midzi S. Factors associated with HIV infection among children born to mothers on the prevention of mother to child transmission programme at Chitungwiza Hospital, Zimbabwe. 2013.
[20]
Endalamaw, Aklilu, Demsie. A systematic review and meta-analysis of vertical transmission route of HIV in Ethiopia. 2018.
[21]
Rate of HIV transmission and associated factors among HIV-exposed infants in selected health facilities of East and West Gojjam Zones, Northwest Ethiopia; retrospective cohort study. 2017.
[22]
Wudineh F, Damtew B. Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV Infection and Its Determinants among Exposed Infants on Care and Follow-Up in Dire Dawa City, Eastern Ethiopia. AIDS Res Treat. 2016; 3262746.
[23]
Obsa S, Dabsu R, Ejeta E. Rate of mother to child transmission of HIV and factors associated among HIV exposed infants in Oromia Regional State, Ethiopia: Retrospective study. Egyptian Pediatric Association Gazette. 2018; 66 (3): 61-5.
[24]
Derebe G, Biadgilign S, Trivelli M. Determinant and outcome of early diagnosis of HIV infection among HIV-exposed infants in southwest Ethiopia. 2014.
[25]
Wondafrash B, DH. Dried blood spot test for hiv exposed infants and children and their anti-retro viral treatment status in selected hospitals in ethiopia. 2016.
[26]
Gebremedhin A, Gebremariam S, Haile F. Predictors of mortality among HIV infected children on anti-retroviral therapy in Mekelle Hospital, Northern Ethiopia: a retrospective cohort study. 2013.
[27]
Beyene GA, Dadi LS, Solomon a. Determinants of HIV infection among children born to mothers on prevention of mother to child transmission program of HIV in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: a case control study. 2018.
[28]
Mother-to-child transmission of HIV infection and its associated factors in Ethiopia: a systematic review and meta-analysis. 2018.
[29]
Berhan Z, Abebe F, Gedefaw M. Risk of HIV and associated factors among infants born to HIV positive women in Amhara region, Ethiopia: a facility based retrospective study. 2014.
[30]
SNNPR. Facility Type - SNNP Regional Health Bureau 2016.
[31]
WHO. Who recommendations on the diagnosis of hiv infection in infants and children. 2010.
[32]
Moges NA, Kassa GM, Boneya DJ. Rate of HIV transmission and associated factors among HIV-exposed infants in selected health facilities of East and West Gojjam Zones, Northwest Ethiopia; retrospective cohort study. BMC Infect Dis. 2017; 17 (1): 475.
[33]
Ketemaw A. Risk of HIV and associated factors among infants born to HIV-positive women in northwest Ethiopia.
Browse journals by subject